What Is a Life Underwriter Training Council Fellow (LUTCF)?

Underwriters' meetingNew insurance agents can get a grounding in the basic skills, such as underwriting, needed to succeed in the field by becoming a Life Underwriter Training Council Fellow (LUTCF). After completing the required training, agents will have greater expertise in prospecting, selling, practice management as well as insight into practice specialties including life and health insurance, employee benefits and annuities. Having a LUTCF also can aid new agents in acquiring a job with an agency and in marketing themselves to prospective clients.

The LUTCF is overseen by the National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors (NAIFA). The training and testing are provided by education company Kaplan through its College for Financial Planning division.

LUTCF Certification Requirements

The core of the certification requirements for the LUTCF is a set of three courses. Each course consists of eight weeks of instruction followed by a week for review and testing.

The first course is an introduction to life insurance and managing a life insurance practice. It covers business planning, ethics, life insurance product basics, risk management, prospecting, selling skills and financial planning.

The second course goes deeper into life insurance as well as annuities, mutual funds and insurance for health, disability, long-term care, group coverage and property and casualty. Risk management, retirement and estate planning are among the subjects covered in the third course.

The third course deals with risk management applications. It covers retirement and estate planning as well as special situations.

The courses are available as self-paced prerecorded lectures. They are also taught live and via interactive online classes. After completing each of the three courses, students must pass a two-hour test. To pass, they must correctly answer 70% of the 50 questions on each test.

The training costs $950 per course for a total of $2,850. The only prerequisite for the LUTCF is to belong to NAIFA, which has a sliding membership fee scale. People in their first year in financial services pay $10 to belong to NAIFA. The fee increases annually until it reaches $56 a year after a member has five years of experience in the field.

After receiving the designation, LUTCF designees can renew it by paying a $50 renewal fee every two years. As part of the renewal process, they also have to demonstrate that they have completed three hours of ethics continuing education every two years. In addition, LUTCF holders must agree to follow standards of professional conduct and be subject to a disciplinary process.

LUTCF Holder Jobs

Insurance worksheetsLUTCF seekers are usually insurance agents at the start of their careers. They may be interested in obtaining the designation as a way to convince potential employers of their commitment and knowledge about the life insurance industry. Having the LUTCF initials on a business card is also seen as an aid in marketing to prospects. The LUTCF is an optional certification and does not confer any specific powers or privileges on holders.

The designation has been around since 1984 and approximately 70,000 people have earned an LUTCF during that time.

Comparable Certifications

There are only a few entry-level certificates available to life insurance agents. In addition to the LUTCF, new agents can choose from:

Financial Services Certified Professional (FSCP) is offered by the American College of Financial Services, which originally co-sponsored the LUTCF with NAIFA. In 2013 the organizations ended their association and the American College of Financial Service began offering the FSCP. It requires passing seven courses on financial services and ethics topics at a combined cost of $3,230.

Registered Financial Associate (RFA) is a designation from the International Association of Registered Financial Consultants. It is offered to agents and other financial professionals who have already received a life insurance license, Series 65 securities license, bachelor degree in a related field or any of a number of professional designations, including a LUTCF. RFAs also have to pay a $250 fee. The only requirement other than that is to pass an examination on the organization’s code of ethics for financial professionals.

Bottom Line

Business meeting

The Life Underwriter Training Council Fellow (LUTCF) certification is one of the first designations sought by beginning life insurance agents. To get one, students have to learn about life and other forms of insurance, mutual funds, annuities, employee benefits and financial advising, in addition to managing a life insurance business, prospecting and selling.

Tips on Insurance

  • A consumer considering purchasing life insurance can increase the chances of making a good decision by having a relationship with a trusted and experienced financial advisor. Finding the right financial advisor that fits your needs doesn’t have to be hard. SmartAsset’s free tool matches you with financial advisors in your area in five minutes. If you’re ready to be matched with local advisors that will help you achieve your financial goals, get started now.
  • Entry-level designations for financial services professionals like the LUTCF indicate that an advisor is interested in learning about the field and following best practices. More advanced certifications such as Chartered Life Underwriter and Certified Financial Planner are likely to indicate that a professional is a more experienced and well-informed source for financial advice.

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/FangXiaNuo, ©iStock.com/hfng, ©iStock.com/jhorrocks

 

The post What Is a Life Underwriter Training Council Fellow (LUTCF)? appeared first on SmartAsset Blog.

Source: smartasset.com

How Long Does It Take To Buy A House?

How long does it take to buy a house? The answer is: it depends. You can buy a house in a matter of weeks or it can take you anywhere from 4 to 6 months. The question is how ready are you? It can take a long time, and that’s just learning about various mortgage options or improving your credit score.

So understanding the various factors involved in buying a house can give you an estimate of how long it will take you to buy the house

Check out now: 5 Signs You Are Not Ready To Buy A House

How long does it take to buy a house? A step-by-step guide.

It can take a homebuyer a few weeks to several months to complete the home buying process. But when determining how long it will take you to buy a house, you first have to find out if you will be pre-approved for a mortgage. There is no sense of shopping for a house to then realize you can’t afford it.

If you are interested in comparing the best mortgage rates through LendingTree click here. It’s completely free.

I. How long does it take to get a pre-approved mortgage letter in order to buy a house?

If you’re serious about buying a house, it’s important to get pre-approved for a mortgage. So when it’s time to make an offer, the seller will know you’re serious. If you don’t have one handy, the seller will likely move to the next buyer.

Getting pre-approved for a mortgage in order to buy a house can take longer. That is because you have to make sure your financial situation is in shape. For example, your income-to-debt ratio, your down payment, and your credit score must be good. That’s exactly what a mortgage lender will look at.

Even when these things are in order, shopping and comparing mortgage rates and fees can take several weeks.

Let’s take a look on how long it will take you to get these things in shape before buying a house.

Click here to compare mortgage rates through LendingTree. It’s completely FREE.

A. How good is your credit score?

A low credit score can make buying a house take longer, because it can take months to a year to improve a bad credit score.

A conventional loan will usually require a 640+ credit score.

In fact, your credit score is the number 1 item mortgage lenders look at to decide whether to offer you a mortgage. And if it is not where it’s supposed to be, you might get rejected.

Luckily for you there are other ways to get a loan with much lower credit score: FHA loans.

FHA loans only require a credit score of 580 with 3.5% down payment. You may get qualified with a 500 credit score, but you’ll have to come with a 10% down payment.

So before you get into the fun part of shopping for a mortgage or visiting homes, it’s best to know what your credit score is and take steps to improve it.

You can get a free credit score at Credit Sesame.

B. Fix errors on your credit report.

Fixing errors on your credit report in order to get pre-approved for a loan in order to buy a house can take 30 days.

According to Transunion, “most investigations are completed within 2 weeks, but some may take up 30 days.”

Again, we recommend you get a free credit report at Credit Sesame. A credit report will give you a detail analysis of your credit history, how much debt you owe, and how creditworthy you are, etc. If there are any errors or inaccuracies, fix them immediately so there’s no surprise when you’re actually applying for a mortgage.

The best way to do that is by filing a Transunion dispute or Equifax dispute.

C. Do you have a down payment for the house?

How long it will take you to buy a house will also depend on whether or not you already have money saved up for a down payment.

Unless you’re going to buy the house with outright cash, you’ll need a down payment. And saving for a down payment can take a long time. Depending on your income and expenses, saving for a down payment on a house can take years.

Assuming, for example, you want to buy a house that will cost you $450,000, and you’re using a conventional loan to finance the house. With a 20% down payment, you will need to come up with $90,000.

Let’s say again, because of other monthly expenses, you can only save $1500 a month for the down payment.

You see how long it will take you to save for a down payment to buy the house? 5 years. And that doesn’t even take into account other upfront costs of buying a house, such as closing cost.

While it’s possible to get a mortgage with a down payment as low as 3.5% of the home purchase price, it’s advisable to put at least 20% down. The reason is because you will avoid paying private mortgage insurance (PMI), which protects the lenders in case you default on your mortgage.

Home buyers with a down payment below 20% are usually charged with PMI.

Another reason for a larger down payment is that it reduces the cost of the mortgage, grows equity much faster, and saves you on interest over the life of the loan.

As you can see, it can take you as much as 5 years from the time you’re thinking about buying the house to the time you’re actually ready to start the process.

But once you have taken care the things above, buying a house can go a lot faster.

II. How long does it take to find a real estate agent?

Average time: 1 day to a month

Once you have been pre-approved for a mortgage, the next step is to find an experienced real estate agent. Finding a good real estate agent can take a day to a month. Websites such as Zillow and Redfin list real estate agents you can use.

III. Shopping for a home.

Average time: a few weeks to a few months

With the help of a real estate agent and your own due diligence, finding a home can can go faster or take longer depending on available homes, the season and your desired location.

But experts say on average it can take a minimum of three weeks to a few months.

IV. Making an offer, negotiation, and inspection.

Average time: 1 to 10 days

Once you have found the home of your dream, the next step is to make an offer. You and the seller can go back and forth negotiating the price.

Once your offer has been accepted, you and the seller sign something called a purchase agreement. Then, the next step is to hire a professional to inspect the home for defects. Depending on your state, a home inspection must be completed within 10 days. And if the inspection finds some defects in the house, that could delay the process.

V. How long does it take to close on a house?

Average time: 30 to 45 days.

Once the inspection is done, your lender will need to officially approve you for the loan. And depending on the lender, it can also affect how long it takes to buy a house. You may need to provide additional documents. But the lender will need to assess the home for its value. And depending on the program (whether it’s conventional loan or FHA loan) it can take anywhere from 30 to 45 days to close on a home.

Bottom line

When asking yourself this question: “how long does it take to buy a house?” The answer is : it depends. If you have your credit score, your down payment, your other finances under control, you can buy your house in two months or less. But if you have to save for a down payment, fix errors on your credit report, raise your credit score, the whole home buying process can take years.

Click here to compare mortgage rates through LendingTree. It’s completely FREE

Still wondering how long it takes to buy a house? Read the following articles:

  • 5 Signs You’re Not Ready To Buy A House
  • 10 First Time Home Buyer Mistakes To Avoid
  • 3 Signs You’re Not Ready to Refinance Your Mortgage
  • The Biggest Mistakes Millennials Make When Buying a House
  • 7 Signs You’re Ready To Buy A House

Work with the Right Financial Advisor

You can talk to a financial advisor who can review your finances and help you reach your goals (whether it is making more money, paying off debt, investing, buying a house, planning for retirement, saving, etc). So, find one who meets your needs with SmartAsset’s free financial advisor matching service. You answer a few questions and they match you with up to three financial advisors in your area. So, if you want help developing a plan to reach your financial goals, get started now.

The post How Long Does It Take To Buy A House? appeared first on GrowthRapidly.

Source: growthrapidly.com

76% of People Who Don’t Fret Over Money Report Doing This

Want to get rid of stress? You could meditate, count to 10 or simply start a zero-based budgeting system. In fact, 76% of people who use such a system report either no financial stress or a decrease in the level of their financial stress last year, according to a recent survey by YNAB (short for “You Need A Budget”), an app that helps people rein in spending and reach financial goals.

Source: moneytalksnews.com

Budgeting Tips for the Sandwich Generation: How to Care for Kids and Parents

Everyone knows that raising kids can put a serious squeeze on your budget. Beyond covering day-to-day living expenses, there are all of those extras to consider—sports, after-school activities, braces, a first car. Oh, and don’t forget about college.

Add caring for elderly parents to the mix, and balancing your financial and family obligations could become even more difficult.

“It can be an emotional and financial roller coaster, being pushed and pulled in multiple directions at the same time,” says financial life planner and author Michael F. Kay.

The “sandwich generation”—which describes people that are raising children and taking care of aging parents—is growing as Baby Boomers continue to age.

According to the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, 17 percent of adult children serve as caregivers for their parents at some point in their lives. Aside from a time commitment, you may also be committing part of your budget to caregiving expenses like food, medications and doctor’s appointments.

Budgeting tips for the sandwich generation include communicating with parents.

When you’re caught in the caregiving crunch, you might be wondering: How do I take care of my parents and kids without going broke?

The answer lies in how you approach budgeting and saving. These money strategies for the sandwich generation and budgeting tips for the sandwich generation can help you balance your financial and family priorities:

Communicate with parents

Quentara Costa, a certified financial planner and founder of investment advisory service POWWOW, LLC, served as caregiver for her father, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, while also managing a career and starting a family. That experience taught her two very important budgeting tips for the sandwich generation.

First, communication is key, and a money strategy for the sandwich generation is to talk with your parents about what they need in terms of care. “It should all start with a frank discussion and plan, preferably prior to any significant health crisis,” Costa says.

Second, run the numbers so you have a realistic understanding of caregiving costs, including how much parents will cover financially and what you can afford to contribute.

.block-quote_5back { background-image: url(https://865cd2fc18498405a75a-f8cbe8cb758c89f0cd738fe08520ecb9.ssl.cf5.rackcdn.com/online-banking/banking-topics/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/5back-730×500.jpg); } @media (min-width: 730px) { .block-quote_5back { background-image: url(https://865cd2fc18498405a75a-f8cbe8cb758c89f0cd738fe08520ecb9.ssl.cf5.rackcdn.com/online-banking/banking-topics/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/5back-1600×600.jpg); } }

17 percent of adult children serve as caregivers for their parents at some point in their lives.

– The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College

Involve kids in financial discussions

While you’re talking over expectations with your parents, take time to do the same with your kids. Caregiving for your parents may be part of the discussion, but these talks can also be an opportunity for you and your children to talk about your family’s bigger financial picture.

With younger kids, for example, that might involve talking about how an allowance can be earned and used. You could teach kids about money using a savings account and discuss the difference between needs and wants. These lessons can help lay a solid money foundation as they as move into their tween and teen years when discussions might become more complex.

When figuring out how to budget for the sandwich generation, try including your kids in financial decisions.

If your teen is on the verge of getting their driver’s license, for example, their expectation might be that you’ll help them buy a car or help with insurance and registration costs. Communicating about who will be contributing to these types of large expenses is a good money strategy for the sandwich generation.

The same goes for college, which can easily be one of the biggest expenses for parents and important when learning how to budget for the sandwich generation. If your budget as a caregiver can’t also accommodate full college tuition, your kids need to know that early on to help with their educational choices.

Talking over expectations—yours and theirs—can help you determine which schools are within reach financially, what scholarship or grant options may be available and whether your student is able to contribute to their education costs through work-study or a part-time job.

Consider the impact of caregiving on your income

When thinking about how to budget for the sandwich generation, consider that caring for aging parents can directly affect your earning potential if you have to cut back on the number of hours you work. The impact to your income will be more significant if you are the primary caregiver and not leveraging other care options, such as an in-home nurse, senior care facility or help from another adult child.

Costa says taking time away from work can be difficult if you’re the primary breadwinner or if your family is dual-income dependent. Losing some or all of your income, even temporarily, could make it challenging to meet your everyday expenses.

.block-quote_100back { background-image: url(https://865cd2fc18498405a75a-f8cbe8cb758c89f0cd738fe08520ecb9.ssl.cf5.rackcdn.com/online-banking/banking-topics/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/100back-730×500.jpg); } @media (min-width: 730px) { .block-quote_100back { background-image: url(https://865cd2fc18498405a75a-f8cbe8cb758c89f0cd738fe08520ecb9.ssl.cf5.rackcdn.com/online-banking/banking-topics/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/100back-1600×600.jpg); } }

“Very rarely do I recommend putting caregiving ahead of the client’s own cash reserve and retirement.”

– Quentara Costa, certified financial planner

When you’re facing a reduced income, how to budget for the sandwich generation is really about getting clear on needs versus wants. Start with a thorough spending review.

Are there expenses you might be able to reduce or eliminate while you’re providing care? How much do you need to earn each month to maintain your family’s standard of living? Keeping your family’s needs in focus and shaping your budget around them is a money strategy for the sandwich generation that can keep you from overextending yourself financially.

“Protect your capital from poor decisions made from emotions,” financial life planner Kay says. “It’s too easy when you’re stretched beyond reason to make in-the-heat-of-the-moment decisions that ultimately are not in anyone’s best interest.”

Keep saving in sight

One of the most important money strategies for the sandwich generation is continuing to save for short- and long-term financial goals.

“Very rarely do I recommend putting caregiving ahead of the client’s own cash reserve and retirement,” financial planner Costa says. “While the intention to put others before ourselves is noble, you may actually be pulling the next generation backwards due to your lack of self-planning.”

Sunny skies are the right time to save for a rainy day.

Start an emergency fund with no minimum balance.

Start Saving

Online
Savings

Discover Bank, Member FDIC

Making regular contributions to your 401(k), an individual retirement account or an IRA CD should still be a priority. Adding to your emergency savings each month—even if you have to reduce the amount you normally save to fit new caregiving expenses into your budget—can help prepare you for unexpected expenses or the occasional cash flow shortfall. Contributing to a 529 college savings plan or a Coverdell ESA is a budgeting tip for the sandwich generation that can help you build a cushion for your children once they’re ready for college life.

When you are learning how to budget for the sandwich generation, don’t forget about your children’s savings goals. If there’s something specific they want to save for, help them figure out how much they need to save and a timeline for reaching their goal.

.post__breaker–7106 { background-image: url(https://865cd2fc18498405a75a-f8cbe8cb758c89f0cd738fe08520ecb9.ssl.cf5.rackcdn.com/online-banking/banking-topics/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Budgeting-Tips-for-the-Sandwich-Generation-How-to-Care-for-Kids-and-Parents_5-FULL-450×200.jpg);}@media (min-width: 450px) { .post__breaker–7106 { background-image: url(https://865cd2fc18498405a75a-f8cbe8cb758c89f0cd738fe08520ecb9.ssl.cf5.rackcdn.com/online-banking/banking-topics/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Budgeting-Tips-for-the-Sandwich-Generation-How-to-Care-for-Kids-and-Parents_5-FULL-730×215.jpg);} }@media (min-width: 730px) { .post__breaker–7106 { background-image: url(https://865cd2fc18498405a75a-f8cbe8cb758c89f0cd738fe08520ecb9.ssl.cf5.rackcdn.com/online-banking/banking-topics/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Budgeting-Tips-for-the-Sandwich-Generation-How-to-Care-for-Kids-and-Parents_5-FULL-992×400.jpg);} }@media (min-width: 992px) { .post__breaker–7106 { background-image: url(https://865cd2fc18498405a75a-f8cbe8cb758c89f0cd738fe08520ecb9.ssl.cf5.rackcdn.com/online-banking/banking-topics/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Budgeting-Tips-for-the-Sandwich-Generation-How-to-Care-for-Kids-and-Parents_5-FULL-1200×400.jpg);} }@media (min-width: 1200px) { .post__breaker–7106 { background-image: url(https://865cd2fc18498405a75a-f8cbe8cb758c89f0cd738fe08520ecb9.ssl.cf5.rackcdn.com/online-banking/banking-topics/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Budgeting-Tips-for-the-Sandwich-Generation-How-to-Care-for-Kids-and-Parents_5-FULL-1600×400.jpg);} }

Ask for help if you need it

A big part of learning how to budget for the sandwich generation is finding resources you can leverage to help balance your family commitments. In the case of aging parents, there may be state or federal programs that can help with the cost of care.

Remember to also loop in your siblings or other family members when researching budgeting tips for the sandwich generation. If you have siblings or relatives, engage them in an open discussion about what they can contribute, financially or in terms of caregiving assistance, to your parents. Getting them involved and asking them to share some of the load can help you balance caregiving for parents while still making sure that you and your family’s financial outlook remains bright.

The post Budgeting Tips for the Sandwich Generation: How to Care for Kids and Parents appeared first on Discover Bank – Banking Topics Blog.

Source: discover.com

Convince Your Spouse You Need To Get Out Of Debt

The post Convince Your Spouse You Need To Get Out Of Debt appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

Need to convince your spouse you need to get out of debt?  You can’t just tell him or her.  You need to address it in the right way.

How to Convince Your Spouse You Need To Get Out of Debt -- Without Fighting!!

Getting out of debt and taking control of your finances is important to your relationship.  Whether you are just starting out or have been together for 25 or  more years, you have to be in the same page financially, or you will be destined for failure.

So, what happens if your spouse is a spender and you are a saver?  Or, what do you do if you want to create a budget you both contribute to, but your spouse refuses to help?  What happens if you want to get out of debt, but your spouse thinks you are fine?

These are questions I get over and over again from readers just like you.  Get my answers on what you can do if you find yourself in any of the following situations.

CONVINCE YOUR SPOUSE YOU NEED TO GET OUT OF DEBT

I WANT TO GET OUT OF DEBT, BUT MY SPOUSE DOES NOT AGREE

This is a very common scenario.  One person feels that there is too much debt and their spouse or partner thinks that they are doing just fine.  What do you do in this situation?  I’ve got the things you can try to help get your spouse or partner onto the same page as you.

 

SET A DATE

Timing is everything when you are discussing debt with your spouse or partner.  If you casually mention it over dinner, it may not actually resonate that you are serious.

Set up a date with your significant other.  Carving out time to have a real, honest discussion about your finances can make all the difference.

 

USE “WE”  – NOT “YOU”

When you sit down to talk, your money and finances should be discussed as “we” and never as “you.”

For instance, instead of saying “You are spending more than you make” – say “We are just spending a bit too much money lately.”

When you are in a relationship, your money is no longer yours and mine, it is ours.  Addressing your debt should be addressed in the same way.

 

NAGGING NOT ALLOWED

If, after you have this discussion, your spouse is still reluctant to get started, take a break.  Circle back around a few weeks later and have another discussion.

The thing you do not want to do is nag him or her about it.  That will create more resentment and be much less successful in developing a plan you both can follow.

MAKE SURE YOU CAN STILL HAVE FUN

The main reason many people are reluctant to get out of debt is they fear that they will not be able to spend any money on anything at all.  That does not have to be the case.

Talk to your partner about your budget and show him or her how you can still leave money for dinner out or the weekly movie dates you love to have together.

One way that my husband and I do this is that we have a “mad money” fund.  This is money which can be spent on whatever we each want.  We designate an envelope for each of us.  When our money is gone, we are done spending.  We actually have turned this into a challenge to see which of us can actually go the longest without spending any money!  After a few months, we agreed that we both won and then turned around and used that money in planning a Disney vacation.

You are a team and together you will need to work up your budget so it works for both of you.

 

BE WILLING TO COMPROMISE

When you sit down for your meeting, don’t have everything planned out.  As tempting as it might be to have the budget all mapped out and show it, that may actually result in your partner being more resistant.

When you talk, take the time to truly listen to what your partner has to say.  Once he or she voices concerns, you will also have a chance to make your case.

When you show that you really do want to listen and work together on this journey, he or she may be much more willing to join you.  However, if you shut him or her out of the conversation, you will not be successful.

 

CREATE A PLAN TOGETHER

Once you both are on the same page with your debt, it is time to make a debt payoff plan. It should include a list of your debts and a way to track your success.  You will work together to achieve your financial goals.  Go through everything together and make sure you both agree to how much you will pay on the debt, your budget and much more.

Putting it in writing will help you both focus on the big picture and give you accountability to one another.  Before you know it, you will be on the path to financial freedom.

 

 

The post Convince Your Spouse You Need To Get Out Of Debt appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

Source: pennypinchinmom.com

How Much Should You Spend on an Engagement Ring?

How Much Should You Spend on an Engagement Ring?

There’s nothing like falling in love and finding the person you want to spend the rest of your life with. But when it’s time to shop for rings, it’s easy to get discouraged by the price tags. Just how much should you spend on an engagement ring? We’ll dive into the topic and discuss ways to save on the big purchase.

Find out not: How much do I need to save for retirement?

What the Average Engagement Ring Costs

Maybe you can’t buy love. But if you’re in the market for an engagement ring, you’ll quickly realize that it won’t be cheap. According to the Knot’s 2016 Real Weddings Study, Americans spent an average of $6,163 on engagement rings, up from $5,871 in 2015. Wedding bands for the bride and engagement rings combined cost between $5,968 and $6,258.

If you want your wedding to happen sooner rather than later, keep in mind that on average, couples spend more than $30,000 to tie the knot. That’s roughly how much you can expect to pay for everything from your wedding reception and DJ to your cake and your photographer. Location matters when it comes to weddings, however, so you might be able to save some money by choosing a more affordable place to host your ceremony.

How Much Should I Spend?

How Much Should You Spend on an Engagement Ring?

Conventional wisdom says that anyone planning to propose to their partner should prepare to spend at least two or three months of their salary on an engagement ring. But spending too much isn’t a good idea for various reasons.

A recent study conducted by Emory University connected pricey rings to divorce rates. Men who spent more money on rings for their fiancees were more likely to end their marriages. That’s a possible long-term consequence of overspending on an engagement ring. In the short term, using a large percentage of your money to buy a ring might prevent you from using those funds to pay bills or stay on top of your debt, which can hurt your credit score.

If the marriage doesn’t work out and your ex-spouse decides to sell their diamond engagement ring, its value won’t be nearly as high as it was when it was first purchased. That’s why diamond rings can be such bad investments.

So exactly how much should you spend on an engagement ring? It’s a good idea to make sure that the price you pay doesn’t prevent you or your partner from accomplishing whatever you’re planning to achieve in the future, whether that’s buying a house or having a child. Rather than following an old-school societal notion that says you should spend x amount of money on a ring, it’s best to spend an amount that won’t compromise your financial goals or jeopardize the status of your relationship.

How to Save on the Ring

If you don’t want the engagement ring you’re buying to break the bank, it’s a good idea to learn as much as you can about the rings and what makes some more expensive than others. Diamonds are the gems most commonly used in engagement rings, and if you’re buying one for your significant other, it’s important to familiarize yourself with what jewelers refer to as the four C’s: clarity, cut, color and carat weight.

In terms of clarity, the best diamonds are flawless, meaning that they don’t have any blemishes when viewed under a microscope with 10 power magnification. Since no one’s eyesight is that powerful, you can get away with choosing a diamond with a lower clarity grade that costs less. Getting a diamond that has fewer carats (meaning that it weighs less) or getting one that isn’t completely colorless can also lower its overall price.

Or don’t get a diamond at all. Your partner might be just as happy with a simple band, a white sapphire or an emerald ring and it probably won’t cost as much as a diamond engagement ring. Shopping for your ring at a vintage store, looking for one online rather than in-person and getting a ring with a series of smaller stones surrounding the center stone (also known as a halo ring) are a few additional ways to save when buying a ring.

Final Word

How Much Should You Spend on an Engagement Ring?

There’s no need to spend a fortune on an engagement ring. And you don’t have to feel guilty about cutting corners in order to find one that you can afford to buy.

Like any other major purchase, it’s a good idea to take time to save up for a ring. If you have to take on more credit card debt or a personal loan in order to buy an engagement ring, it’s a good idea to find out how long it’ll take to pay off your debt. It isn’t wise to begin a marriage by digging yourself (and your partner) into a deep financial hole.

Tips for Getting Financially Ready for Marriage

  • If you haven’t already, start talking about money. It’s important to establish an open dialogue and make sure you understand and respect each other’s money values.
  • You might also consider sit down with a financial advisor before the big day. A financial advisor can help you identify your financial goals and come up with a financial plan for your life as a married couple. A matching tool (like ours) can help you find a person to work with to meet your needs. First you’ll answer a series of questions about your situation and goals. Then the program will narrow down your options from thousands of advisors to three fiduciaries who suit your needs. You can then read their profiles to learn more about them, interview them on the phone or in person and choose who to work with in the future. This allows you to find a good fit while the program does much of the hard work for you.

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/sergey_b_a, ©iStock.com/svetikd, ©iStock.com/adamkaz

The post How Much Should You Spend on an Engagement Ring? appeared first on SmartAsset Blog.

Source: smartasset.com

Increasing Your Savings on a Low-Income Salary

A low-income salary can create challenges when it comes to reaching your financial goals. You may want to take a vacation, buy a new car, or just put some cash away for a rainy day, but how can you do that with a limited income? Although you may struggle to add to your savings, there […]

The post Increasing Your Savings on a Low-Income Salary appeared first on Credit Absolute.

Source: creditabsolute.com

Credit Card Payoff Calculator: When Could You Reach Financial Freedom?

.calculator-wrap{margin-top:40px;margin-bottom:40px;width:100%;font-family:Avenir,sans-serif;border:2px solid #ebebeb;border-radius:8px;border-top:0;border-top-left-radius:0;border-top-right-radius:0;box-sizing:border-box}.calculator-wrap p:empty{display:none}.calculator-wrap footer,.calculator-wrap main{padding:30px}.calculator-wrap main{padding-bottom:0}.calculator-top{padding-bottom:20px}.calculator-top::after{content:”*Disclaimer: This calculator uses an amortization method to estimate your credit card payoff plan. Each credit card may vary in results and payoff dates may be longer than projected.”;position:relative;bottom:0;width:100%;margin-left:.calculator-top p{font-weight:700}.calculator-top>p{text-align:center;font-weight:500;font-size:18px;margin-top:10px;margin-bottom:40px;color:#2e2f30}.calculator-top .calc-row:last-of-type{margin-top:15px;margin-bottom:20px}.calculator-wrap .calc-row>p,.calculator-wrap label{position:relative;font-weight:500;font-size:18px;margin-bottom:0;color:#75767b}.calculator-wrap input[type=date],.calculator-wrap input[type=number]{display:block;width:100%;min-height:43px;padding:8px;line-height:1.5;position:relative;margin-top:5px;font-weight:400;font-size:16px}.calculator-wrap p.invalid input[type=date],.calculator-wrap p.invalid input[type=number]{border:1.5px solid red}.calculator-wrap p.invalid-message{display:none;position:absolute;color:red;font-size:10px!important;margin-top:-7px;font-weight:500!important}.calculator-wrap p.invalid+p.invalid-message{display:block}::placeholder{font-weight:400;font-size:16px}::-webkit-datetime-edit-day-field:focus,::-webkit-datetime-edit-month-field:focus,::-webkit-datetime-edit-year-field:focus{background:#00a6a4;font-weight:400}.calculator-wrap .tooltip-icon{position:relative;right:-5px;bottom:2px;width:13px;height:13px}.calculator-wrap .tooltip-text{background-color:#75767b;color:#fff!important;font-family:Avenir,sans-serif;font-size:14px!important;padding:8px;position:absolute!important;border-radius:12px;width:150px;display:none;left:106px;top:34px;z-index:1;text-transform:none;font-weight:400;text-align:left;white-space:normal}.calculator-wrap .tooltip-icon:focus+p+.tooltip-text,.calculator-wrap .tooltip-icon:hover+p+.tooltip-text,.calculator-wrap p.tooltip-text-p:focus+p+.tooltip-text,.calculator-wrap p.tooltip-text-p:hover+p+.tooltip-text{display:block}.calculator-wrap .col-wrap{display:flex;justify-content:space-between;flex-wrap:wrap}.calculator-top .col-wrap .col{display:flex;justify-content:space-between;flex-direction:column;width:260px;max-width:100%}@media(min-width:651px) and (max-width:767px){.calculator-top .col-wrap .col+.col{margin-left:20px}}@media(min-width:768px) and (max-width:975px){.calculator-top .calc-row,.calculator-top .calc-row:last-of-type{margin-top:10px;margin-bottom:30px}}@media(max-width:650px){.calculator-top .calc-row,.calculator-top .calc-row:last-of-type{margin-top:10px;margin-bottom:30px}}.calculator-top .col-right input[type=radio]+label{margin-bottom:5px;margin-left:20px;font-size:16px;color:#393a3d}.calculator-top input[type=radio]{position:absolute;opacity:0}.calculator-top label{position:relative;width:100%}.calculator-top label>span{display:flex;width:14px;height:14px;border:1px solid #333;background-color:#fff;position:absolute;top:5px;left:-20px;border-radius:50%;justify-content:center;align-items:center}.calculator-top input:focus+label>span,.calculator-top label:focus-within>span{border:1.5px solid #333}.calculator-top label>span>span{display:block;width:10px;height:10px;background-color:transparent;border-radius:50%;transition:all .25s ease-in-out}.calculator-top input:checked+label>span>span{background-color:#00a6a4}.cc-monthly-wrap{display:none}.calculator-header h2{font-family:Avenir,sans-serif;font-size:35px;color:#fff;font-weight:700;width:100%;background-color:#00a6a4;padding:40px 0 40px 0;text-align:center;box-sizing:border-box;margin:0;border-top-left-radius:8px;border-top-right-radius:8px}.calculator-wrap .btn-wrap{margin-top:20px}.calculator-wrap button{background-color:#00a6a4;border:1.5px solid #00a6a4;border-radius:3px;color:#fff;font-size:16px;font-weight:600;padding:12px 38px;min-width:147px;min-height:49px;margin-right:20px;margin-bottom:20px;transition:all .25s ease-in-out}.calculator-wrap button#calculateBtn{border-width:1.5px}.calculator-wrap button#calculateBtn:focus,.calculator-wrap button#calculateBtn:hover{background:#fff;color:#00a6a4}.calculator-wrap button#resetBtn{background-color:#fff;color:#00a6a4}.calculator-wrap button#resetBtn:focus,.calculator-wrap button#resetBtn:hover{background-color:#00a6a4;color:#fff}.calculator-wrap a.signup-calc{font-size:16px;font-weight:700;color:#fff;border:1.5px solid #ff9331;background-color:#ff9331;text-align:center;height:48px;width:158px;border-radius:5px;cursor:pointer;display:inline-block;margin:30px auto 0;display:flex;align-items:center;justify-content:center;transition:all .25s ease-in-out}.calculator-wrap a.signup-calc:focus,.calculator-wrap a.signup-calc:hover{background-color:#fff;color:#ff9331}.calculator-wrap footer{padding-top:40px;border-top:1.5px solid #333}.calculator-wrap footer>p{font-size:16px;text-align:center;font-weight:700}.calculator-bottom,.calculator-middle{width:calc(100% + 62px);margin:0 -31px;padding:30px 0;background-color:#f8f8f8;border-bottom:1.5px solid #333;text-align:center}.calculator-bottom{border-bottom:0}.calculator-middle{position:relative;border-top:1.5px solid #333}.calculator-middle:after{content:”;width:1.5px;height:100%;background-color:#333;display:block;position:absolute;top:0;left:50%}.calculator-middle .col-wrap .col{width:50%}.calculator-bottom>p:first-of-type,.calculator-middle .col>p:first-of-type{text-transform:uppercase;font-weight:800;color:#77777c}.calculator-bottom>p:last-of-type,.calculator-middle .col>p:last-of-type{color:#333;font-weight:800;font-size:34px}@media(max-width:440px){.calculator-bottom>p:first-of-type,.calculator-middle .col>p:first-of-type{font-size:14px}.calculator-bottom>p:last-of-type,.calculator-middle .col>p:last-of-type{font-size:20px}}.calculator-bottom>p:last-of-type{font-size:24px}.calculator-bottom .chart{display:flex}@media(max-width:530px){.calculator-bottom .chart{flex-wrap:wrap}}.calculator-bottom .chart>div{position:relative}.calculator-bottom .chart>div:first-of-type{width:62%}.calculator-bottom .chart>div:last-of-type{width:38%;margin-left:70px}.calculator-bottom .chart div:last-of-type{text-align:left}.calculator-bottom .chart>div:last-of-type{padding-top:70px}.calculator-bottom .chart div p:first-of-type{font-size:18px;font-weight:500;line-height:.87;color:#75767b;position:relative}.calculator-bottom .chart div p:last-of-type{font-size:28px;font-weight:800;line-height:1.43;letter-spacing:normal;text-align:left;color:#2e2f30}.chart .total-principal{margin-bottom:30px}.chart .total-interest p.main-p:before,.chart .total-principal p.main-p:before{content:”;display:block;width:20px;height:20px;border-radius:2px;background-color:#00a6a4;position:absolute;left:-32px;top:-2px}.chart .total-interest p.main-p:before{background-color:#ff9331}.chart-left{margin-top:-60px}@media(max-width:530px){.calculator-bottom .chart>div{width:100%!important}.calculator-bottom .chart>div:last-of-type{margin-left:0!important}.calculator-bottom .chart div p{text-align:center!important}.chart .total-principal{text-align:center}.calculator-bottom .chart div:last-of-type{text-align:center}.calculator-bottom .chart div p:first-of-type{display:inline-block;min-width:120px;text-align:left!important;margin-left:30px!important}.chart .total-interest p.main-p:before,.chart .total-principal p.main-p:before{position:relative;left:-30px;top:16px}.calculator-bottom .chart div p:last-of-type{margin-left:-6px}}.svg-wrap{width:100%;font-size:16px;margin:0 auto}.svg-wrap svg{width:250px;margin:80px auto 0;display:block}@keyframes donutfade{0%{opacity:.2}100%{opacity:1}}.donut-ring{stroke:#ff9331}.donut-segment{transform-origin:center;stroke:#ff6200}.donut-segment-2{stroke:#00a6a4;stroke-dasharray:50px,50px;transition:all 1s ease-in-out}.donut-segment-3{stroke:#d9e021;animation:donut2 3s}.donut-segment-4{stroke:#ed1e79;animation:donut3 3s}.segment-1{fill:#ccc}.segment-2{fill:#00a6a4}.segment-3{fill:#d9e021}.segment-4{fill:#ed1e79}.donut-label{font-size:.28em;font-weight:700;line-height:1;fill:#000;transform:translateY(.25em)}.donut-percent{font-size:.5em;line-height:1;transform:translateY(.5em);font-weight:700}.donut-data{font-size:.12em;line-height:1;transform:translateY(.5em);text-align:center;text-anchor:middle;color:#666;fill:#666;animation:donutfadelong 1s}svg .heavy{font:bold 2.5px Avenir,sans-serif;text-transform:uppercase;fill:#75767b}svg .total-paid{font:bold 4.5px Avenir,sans-serif;fill:#2e2f30}

Have credit card debt? You’re not the only one. It’s reported that 43 percent of households carry credit card debt month after month. While credit cards can be a great tool to build your credit score, they can easily impact your budget. If you’ve detoured from your financial goals and racked up a hefty bill, now is the perfect time to create a payoff plan. Use our credit card payoff calculator to see when you could be financially free.

Credit Card Payoff Calculator

Enter your card details to calculate your payoff timeline.

Choose One

Please enter your desired payoff date.

Please enter your monthly payment.

Time to Payoff

30 Months

Debt-Free Date

Apr 2023

Monthly Payment

$250.00

Total Paid$7,493.77

Total Principal

$5,000.00

Total Interest

$0.00

See where the rest of your budget is going

to pay off debts that have the highest interest rates to save on added expenses. Use our credit card payoff calculator to see which accounts would cost you more in the long-term.

2. See What Payments Work for Your Budget

Once you have an idea of which accounts you’d like to focus on, figure out the right payments for your budget. Keep in mind, you should still make the minimum payments on debts to keep your credit score in good shape. To calculate how comfortable you are with these payments, download our app and evaluate your budget.

3. Negotiate Your Credit Card Terms

If you have a strong credit score and loyalty to your credit card company, you may be able to negotiate your terms. For example, if you’d like your payment to be due on the 25th instead of the 10th of every month, call a representative and see what they can do. You may not always get what you ask for, but you won’t get what you don’t ask for!

4. Reprioritize Your Budget

After you get a better idea of what your budget looks like, prioritize your expenses. As your wants and needs change, adjust your budget accordingly.

Paying off credit card debt may not be as appealing as buying a new car, but it can be a more responsible financial choice depending on your situation. To ensure you’re staying on track with your biggest financial goals, always keep track of your budget using our app.

The post Credit Card Payoff Calculator: When Could You Reach Financial Freedom? appeared first on MintLife Blog.

Source: mint.intuit.com

10 Things to Know About Working in New York

10 Things to Know About Working in New York
Thinking about working in New York? There are some features of work life in the Big Apple that set it apart from the work culture in other cities. Is it true that if you can make it there you can make it anywhere? We’re not making any promises, but we can give you some tips about what working in New York is really like. 

Check out our 401(k) calculator. 

1. Salaries are high – but so is the cost of living.

For many fields, particularly those that require highly skilled workers, salaries in New York are higher than those in other cities. But before you get too excited about the fact that salaries in New York tend to be higher, keep in mind that the cost of living in New York is higher, too.

Luckily, there are plenty of financial experts around to help you figure out how to keep your finances in check. These are the top 10 New York financial advisor firms.

2. New Yorkers put in long hours.

New Yorkers tend to work longer hours than folks in other cities. In part, that’s because the workday itself is longer, but it’s also because New Yorkers tend to have long commutes. If you want to have plenty of free time to pursue side hustles or hobbies, working in New York might not be the best fit for you.

3. Commuting by public transit is the norm.

According to recent Census Bureau figures, 55.6% of New Yorkers take public transportation to work, 0.8% bike to work, 10.3% walk and 3.9% work at home. Hate crowds? Commuting by public transit could take some getting used to.

4. Office happy hour options are plentiful.

Working in New York means having a multitude of options for weekday lunches and office happy hours at your fingertips. Socializing with your coworkers after the end of a workday is easy with so many places to go and easy public transportation options to take you home at the end of the evening.

5. Being a working parent is expensive in New York.

10 Things to Know About Working in New York

New York has some of the highest childcare costs of any city in the nation. Being a working parent in New York is expensive – and it’s not easy, given the long hours New Yorkers put in. New York has a lower rate of working mothers than many other major U.S. cities, in part because the high price of childcare makes it hard for many New Yorkers to earn more than they would have to pay for childcare.

6. New York work culture takes some of its cues from Silicon Valley.

Some New York workplaces are taking their cues from the start-ups of Silicon Valley, implementing casual attire, flexible workdays and other features. In an effort to compete with companies in other cities, some New York companies are expanding the perks they offer their workers, so if you’re lucky enough to get a job in one of those companies, you’ll find that working in New York has its compensations.

7. Lots of New Yorkers have more than one job.

Whether they’re care workers who work double shifts or actors who tend bar on the side, many New Yorkers have more than one job. For some, having a second (or third) job is a matter of necessity, while for others it’s a way of advancing their career or expressing their artistic side. Plus, getting a second job (or a roommate) makes it easier to live the New York dream without going into debt.

8. There are professional support opportunities here.

Because it’s a huge, densely populated city, New York has professional support opportunities for those up and down the career ladder. You can get help finding a job or finishing your GED. You can also attend high-powered networking events and conferences. The important thing is to know what resources are out there and how to take advantage of them.

9. You can outsource a lot of tasks – if you have the money.

If it’s in your budget, you can outsource a lot of tasks that you don’t want to have to tackle during your non-working hours. That includes mailing packages, getting food, dropping off dry cleaning, completing home repairs and more. Of course, these services aren’t within reach of all New Yorkers, and many people like to do these basic “life admin” tasks themselves. But if you’re planning on diving into the workaholic lifestyle in New York and you think you’ll have some money to spare, there are lots of companies looking to make outsourcing chores easier for you.

10. It helps to know someone.

It helps to know someone when you’re looking for work in New York, if only to stand out from the pile of applications that so many New York jobs attract. That’s why it’s a good idea to build and maintain your network and put it to work for you when you’re looking for a new (or just better) job.

Bottom Line

10 Things to Know About Working in New York

Working in New York isn’t for everyone, but many find it to be an exciting challenge unlike what they would face elsewhere. For others, working in New York is more of a means to an end – living in New York. Wherever you stand, working in New York is made easier when you have a strong network and plenty of determination.

Tips for Maximizing Your Money

  • Come up with a budget – and stick to it. Instead of spending $5 a day on a latte, put that money in one of the best savings accounts where you can earn interest.
  • Work with a financial advisor. In addition to helping you craft a financial plan and identify your financial goals, a financial advisor can help you determine the right investments for your financial situation, time horizon and level of risk tolerance. A matching tool like SmartAsset’s SmartAdvisor can help you find a person to work with to meet your needs. First you’ll answer a series of questions about your situation and goals. Then the program will narrow down your options from thousands of advisors to three fiduciaries who suit your needs. You can then read their profiles to learn more about them, interview them on the phone or in person and choose who to work with in the future. This allows you to find a good fit while the program does much of the hard work for you.

Photo credit: Â©iStock.com/Tempura, ©iStock.com/NYCstocker, ©iStock.com/Pavlina2510  

The post 10 Things to Know About Working in New York appeared first on SmartAsset Blog.

Source: smartasset.com