FHA vs. Conventional Loans: Which Is Better?

When it comes to affording a new home, you have a few types of home loans to choose from. Prospective homebuyers often compare the FHA vs. the conventional loan when researching loans. Each loan type has certain stereotypes associated with them, but we are here to give you the facts about both FHA and conventional loans. This post will help you understand what each loan is, familiarize you with the differences between them, and provide some guidelines for how to pick which one is best for you.

What Is An FHA Loan?

An FHA loan is insured by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA). These loans are issued by private lenders, but lenders are protected from losses by the FHA if the homeowner fails to repay. FHA loans are generally used to refinance or buy a home.

What Is A Conventional Loan?

A conventional loan is supplied by a private lender and isn’t federally insured. Requirements for obtaining a conventional loan vary depending on the lender. When used to buy property, conventional loans are typically known as mortgages.

What Is A Conventional Loan?

Differences Between FHA and Conventional Loans

The main difference between FHA and conventional loans is whether or not they are insured by the federal government. Conventional loans aren’t federally backed, so it’s riskier for the lender to loan money. On the other hand, FHA loans are protected by the government, and as a result of less risk, they can typically offer better deals.

This difference in federal insurance is the reason why FHA and conventional loans vary when it comes to the details of the loan. Keep reading to learn the differences regarding credit requirements, minimum down payments, debt-to-income ratios, loan limits, mortgage insurance, and closing costs.

FHA Loan Conventional Loan
Minimum Credit Score 500 620
Minimum Down Payment 3.5% 3%
Maximum Debt-to-Income Ratio Credit score of 500: 43%
Credit score of 580+: 43-50%
Credit score of 620: 33-36%
Credit score of 740+: 36-45%
Loan Limits Low-cost counties: $356,362
High-cost counties: $822,375
Contiguous US: $548,250
High-cost counties, AK, HI, and US territories: $822,375
Mortgage Insurance Mortgage insurance premiums required. Private mortgage insurance required with down payments less than 20%.
Property Standards Stricter standards, property purchased must be a primary residence. Flexible standards, property purchased doesn’t have to be a primary residence.

Sources: FHA Single Family Housing Policy Handbook | Fannie Mae 1 2 | Federal Housing Finance Agency | Freddie Mac | HUD 1 2 | Consumer Financial Protection Bureau 1 2

Credit Score

Your credit score is a determining factor in your loan eligibility. Your credit score is measured on a scale of 300 (poor credit) to 850 (excellent credit). Good credit helps you get approved for loans more easily and at better rates. FHA and conventional loans differ in their credit score requirements and represent financial options for individuals at either end of the credit spectrum.

Minimum Credit Score for FHA Loan: 500

  • Accepts a credit score as low as 500, but usually with a 10% down payment
  • These loans accept lower credit scores because they are insured
  • Note: Some lenders may only issue FHA loans with higher credit scores

Minimum Credit Score for Conventional Loan: 620

  • Accepted score may vary from lender to lender
  • These loans are usually offered to individuals with strong credit because they present less risk to lenders

Minimum Down Payment

A down payment is the sum of money that is paid as a percentage of your purchase up-front.

Minimum Down Payment on an FHA loan:

  • 10% of your purchase with 500 credit score
  • 3.5% of your purchase with 580+ credit score

Minimum Down Payment on a Conventional Loan:

  • 3% of your purchase can be put down with good credit
  • 5% to 20% of your purchase price is typical

Debt-to-Income Ratio

Your debt-to-income ratio is the amount of money paid toward debt each month divided by your total monthly income. To be eligible for a loan, you must be at or below the maximum debt-to-income (DTI) ratio.

Maximum DTI Ratio Guidelines for FHA loans:

  • 43% with a credit score of 500
  • 43–50% with a credit score of 580

Maximum DTI Ratio Guidelines For Conventional Loans:

  • 33-36% with a credit score lower than 740
  • 36-45% with a credit score of 740 or higher
  • 50% highest allowed through Fannie Mae

Loan Limits

Both FHA and conventional loans have limits on the amount that you can borrow. Loan limits vary based on your location and the year your loan is borrowed. Find 2021 loan limits specific to your county through the Federal Housing Finance Agency.

2021 FHA Loan Limits

  • High-cost counties: $822,375
  • Low-cost counties: $356,362

2021 Conventional Loan Limits

  • Contiguous US (excluding high-cost counties): $548,250
  • Alaska, Hawaii, US territories, and high-cost counties: $822,375

Mortgage Insurance

Mortgage insurance is taken out to protect the lender from losses in case you fail to repay your loan. Whether you will pay private mortgage insurance or mortgage insurance premiums is based on your loan type and down payment percentage.

FHA Loan

  • Mortgage insurance is required for all FHA loans.
  • It is paid to the FHA in the form of mortgage insurance premiums and includes an up-front and monthly premium.
  • MIP payments last the entire life of your FHA loan.
  • To get rid of MIPs after paying 20% of your loan, you can choose to refinance into a conventional loan.

Conventional Loan

  • Private mortgage insurance (PMI) is only required when a down payment below 20% is made.
  • PMI comes in different forms: monthly premium, up-front premium, and split premiums.
  • PMI requirements stop once you have met one of three requirements:
    1. Principal loan amount is reduced to 80% before the loan term ends.
    2. At least 78% of the principal balance is scheduled to be paid down.
    3. The halfway point of your loan term has passed.

Property Standards

There are different property standards that must be met to use each loan. FHA loans have stricter requirements, while conventional loans have more flexibility.

FHA Loan

  • Property purchased with FHA loans must be your principal residence, meaning the borrower has to occupy the residence
  • FHA loans can’t be used to invest in property (e.g., renting out or flipping)
  • Title must be in the borrower’s name or name of a living trust

Conventional Loan

  • Property purchased with a conventional loan doesn’t have to be a principal residence — second or third residences are allowed
  • Conventional loans can be used to purchase investment properties

Pros and Cons of FHA vs. Conventional Loans

As a result of the various differences between FHA and conventional loans, each type has its respective pros and cons.

FHA Loan

Conventional Loan

Pros

  • Qualify with low credit and high DTI
  • Smaller down payments overall
  • More affordable with low credit
  • Lowest option for down payments with good credit
  • PMI cancellable
  • More affordable with good credit
  • Property doesn’t have to be your main home

Cons

  • Mortgage insurance premiums required for life of loan
  • Property purchased must be your main home
  • Need higher credit and lower DTI to qualify
  • Typically has larger down payments
  • PMI required with a down payment less than 20%

Pros and Cons of FHA Loans

FHA loans are government-regulated and insured to extend flexible opportunities for homeownership. They’re flexible regarding credit and DTI, but stricter about insurance and property standards.

Pros

  • Flexible qualification with low credit and high DTI
  • Smaller down payments overall
  • More affordable with low credit

Cons

  • Mortgage insurance premiums required for life of loan
  • Property purchased must be your primary residence

Pros and Cons of Conventional Loans

Conventional loans can also offer flexibility, but generally only if you have good credit and demonstrate reduced risk to the lender. These loans have stricter qualifications, but flexibility in other areas.

Pros

  • Lowest option for down payments (3% with good credit)
  • Private mortgage insurance can be canceled (must meet requirements)
  • More affordable with good credit
  • Property purchased doesn’t have to be a primary residence

Cons

  • Strict qualifications require higher credit and lower DTI
  • Larger down payments are typical
  • Private mortgage insurance required with a down payment less than 20%

Which Loan Is Better For You?

Both FHA and conventional loans have their advantages and disadvantages. Here are some general guidelines for when to use an FHA loan or a conventional loan.

When To Use an FHA Loan

  • You have a low credit score (500–619)
  • Your DTI ratio is on the higher side (between 45–50%)
  • You can only afford a small down payment
  • You plan to use the property as your primary residence

When To Use an FHA Loan

When To Use a Conventional Loan

  • Your credit score is fairly good (620 or above)
  • Your DTI ratio is on the lower side (33–36%)
  • You can afford a larger down payment
  • You want flexibility with insurance and repaying your loan

When To Use a Conventional Loan

It’s important to thoroughly research your options before choosing a loan. A key takeaway when comparing FHA vs. conventional loans is that FHA loans are federally insured and conventional loans aren’t. This distinction results in different qualification and payment requirements for each loan.

Use the information in this post to carefully compare the differences in accepted credit scores, minimum down payments, loan limits, maximum debt-to-income ratios, mortgage insurance and property standards. In doing so, choose the loan that works for your circumstances and helps you best afford the home of your dreams.

Sources: FHA Single Family Housing Policy Handbook | US Dept. of Housing and Urban Development | Federal Housing Finance Agency | Freddie Mac

The post FHA vs. Conventional Loans: Which Is Better? appeared first on MintLife Blog.

Source: mint.intuit.com

How to Buy a Used Car, Step By Step

New cars are sleek, shiny, full of impressive tech and smell amazing — mmm, new car smell. But they also come with price tags that can take your breath away — and not in a good way.

According to Kelley Blue Book, the average price of a new car in November 2020 was more than $39,000. Yowser.

If you’re in the market for a set of wheels that’s more affordable, steer your sights over to the used car lot to save a little money. Or even a lot of money.

Why Buying a Used Car Is a Smart Money Move

If you’ve ever heard someone refer to a car as a depreciating asset, it’s true. The longer you have a car, the less it’s worth. The first year of owning a new vehicle is when depreciation really packs a punch.

Jim Sharifi, formerly a content editor at Carfax, said research shows a new vehicle can lose as much as 10% of its value within the first month.

“In the first year of ownership, depreciation can continue, and that same car could be worth up to 20% less than its original sale price,” he said.

When you buy a used car, the original owner has already taken that initial hit on depreciation and the price you pay accounts for that, so you don’t have to shell out as much cash.

Just because you’re buying a car at a lower price point doesn’t mean you’ll be stuck with a clunker that was manufactured decades ago. Cars that are just two or three years old often hit dealership lots when their previous owners reach the end of their lease.

Those vehicles often have low mileage and are in great condition, having had only one previous owner. Sometimes they even still retain a hint of that new car smell.

So that covers the why. Now let’s get into how to buy a used car.

The Best Time to Buy a Used Car

RobertCorse/Getty Images

Unlike new car releases, used cars come on the market throughout the year. It all depends on when their previous owners end their leases, put them up for sale or decide to trade in their vehicles.

However, there are certain times when you’re more likely to score a better deal.

Matt DeLorenzo, senior managing editor for Kelley Blue Book, said when dealerships host big sales events for new models that can also benefit used car shoppers.

“[Dealerships] will have more used vehicle inventory as a result of those types of promotions,” he said.

Think of the big sales that fall around holidays like Memorial Day, Fourth of July and Labor Day.

The end of a model year — around September or October — is another good time to shop, DeLorenzo noted, as salespeople are looking to make deals to clear out their used vehicle stock to make room for new inventory.

It’s best to avoid shopping for a car on the weekend when there’s an influx of customers and sales staff is spread thin, Sharifi said. You’ll get more attention from the sales team by visiting on off hours, specifically on weekdays.

“The end of the month (or the end of a quarter) can also be a good time to strike a deal, since dealerships may need to hit monthly or quarterly sales goals,” he said.

Of course, when you need a car might not align with a particular sale or time of month. Shopping for a vehicle before you’re in critical need of one will allow you time to search for the best deal rather than having to settle for something quick.

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Where to Shop for a Used Car — and Where to Avoid

Where you shop for a used car matters so you can avoid purchasing a lemon.

DeLorenzo recommends shopping at franchised car dealerships that have certified pre-owned cars — used vehicles that have been thoroughly inspected and typically come with some type of warranty coverage. Non-certified cars aren’t bad — and they’ll typically cost less — but they’re more likely to have higher mileage and more maintenance needs.

Be wary of independent car lots that boast they can make you a deal regardless of your credit or circumstance.

“Typically they’ll try to get you in with a low price, but you may not be getting the best quality car,” he said. “The other thing is that if you get your financing through those types of dealers, they typically charge you a much higher interest rate.”

Pro Tip

DeLorenzo recommends pre-qualifying for a loan at a bank or credit union before visiting a dealership. You can compare the offer with the dealer’s financing terms for better negotiating leverage.

For any dealer you visit, do some due diligence and check customer reviews online. If you know others who’ve recently purchased a car, ask for recommendations.

Outside of dealerships, look for cars online at trusted sites like Autotrader, Kelley Blue Book, Carfax or Edmunds — or buy from a private seller.

When you’re buying from a private party, you may be able to get more accurate information about how they’ve driven and maintained the vehicle and what particular issues it might have, said Ron Montoya, senior consumer advice editor at Edmunds.

However, you also need to be OK with buying the vehicle as-is and securing your own financing. And be sure the owner has clear title to the car — in other words, don’t let anyone sell you a car they don’t legitimately own.

If cost is your primary concern, a private seller is likely to offer a lower price. A dealer folds overhead, repairs and marketing into its price.

What to Look for When Buying a Used Car

GreenPimp/Getty Images

Knowing when and where to buy a used car is just half the battle. Figuring out how to vet a used car can be tough, especially if you have little to no car knowledge.

These tips will give you some guidance to make a good choice.

1. Find a Vehicle That Fits Your Needs

It’s easy to focus on the numbers — age of the car, mileage and cost — but you also want to make sure you’re buying a car that’ll fit your needs for however long you expect to have it. If you have a growing family, you might want to rethink that two-door coupe or compact vehicle.

“You want to make sure there’s enough room for you,” Montoya said. “Take a look at the cargo area. Take a look at how easy it is to see out of the vehicle. Test out the entertainment system.”

2. Determine How ‘Used’ You’re Willing to Go

The older a car is, the cheaper it’ll be — but the more it’s likely to have issues requiring repair. Everyone has a different comfort level when it comes to what they’re willing to handle. A general rule of thumb is that a car is driven about 12,000 miles per year. A higher average could mean the car has more wear and tear.

Montoya said used car buyers must strike a balance between the age of the car, the amount of miles and what price they’re willing to pay.

Buying an extended warranty or service plan can give you peace of mind that certain repairs or maintenance jobs will be covered.

Pro Tip

Montoya said plans sold by auto manufacturers or reputable dealerships are better options than those sold by third-party companies. Make sure you understand exactly what your plan covers.

3. Make Sure The Price is Right

Before you accept a sales price, research the value of the car to make sure you’re not overpaying. Carfax, Kelley Blue Book and Edmunds all have price appraisal tools online.

You can also compare similar vehicles on the market to get an estimate of a car’s value, but keep in mind, no two used vehicles will be the same due to how they were driven and maintained. Use all this information when you sit down to negotiate — and don’t be afraid to walk away if you don’t think you’re getting a fair price.

When you’re budgeting for a car purchase, make sure you’re factoring in all the associated costs, like sales tax, insurance and getting the car registered.

4. Check the History of the Car

Sometimes just looking at a car will give you some idea of its history. Rust, worn out pedals and a side panel painted in a different color are red flags.

But don’t just assume a car’s history. Getting the car’s history report, such as through Carfax, is a crucial step when buying a used car.

You’ll have to purchase the report if you’re buying from a private seller, so wait until you’re seriously interested in a particular vehicle. If you’re buying from a dealership, the salesperson should provide a copy of the vehicle history report for free.

Sharifi said to watch out for discrepancies with the odometer reading and if there’s a branded title, which indicates that the car has been significantly compromised in some way.

“Severe accidents and instances where a car has been declared a total loss should signal the buyer to use caution,” he said. “That said, a small fender bender shouldn’t always mean that a buyer should walk away from a great deal.”

5. Go for a Test Drive

Always, always, always take a car for a spin before buying it. If you can bring a mechanic with you, even better.

“Some general things you can do on your own without being super knowledgeable about cars is [to] turn off the radio [and] listen for any strange noises,” Montoya said. “See if the steering wheel stays straight when you drive down the road. Does it pull to one side? Look at the tires to see how old they are.”

Pro Tip

Don’t just look at the tires’ tread. Each tire should include a four-digit number marking the month and year it was manufactured. Tires older than six years can be dried out and need replacing.

For any used car purchase, but especially if you’re buying from a private seller, have your mechanic inspect the vehicle before committing to buy.

Knowing the ins and outs of how to buy a used car will make the whole process less stressful and, most importantly, save you money.

Nicole Dow is a senior writer at The Penny Hoarder. Former staff writer Carson Kohler contributed to this post.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

Source: thepennyhoarder.com

Guide to Managing Finances for Deploying Service Members

Life in the military offers some distinct experiences compared to civilian life, and that includes your budget and finances. The pre-deployment process can feel overwhelming, especially when you’re organizing your money and bills. 

It’s important you provide your family with everything they need to keep you and any dependents comfortable and stable. This means gathering paperwork, making phone calls to service providers, creating new budgets, and organizing your estate. The more you prepare ahead of time, the less you have to worry about the state of your investments and finances when you return home. 

To help make the process easier, we’ve gathered everything you need to know for deployment finances. Read on or jump to a specific category below:

Pre-Deployment Needs

  • Review Your Estate
  • Reassign Financial Responsibilities
  • Update Your Services
  • Build a Budget
  • Prepare a Deployment Binder

Deployment Needs

  • Protect Yourself From Fraud
  • Adjust Your Savings
  • Financial Assistance

Post-Deployment Needs

  • Update Your Budget
  • Pay Off Debt
  • Review Legal Documents

Before Your Deployment

There’s a lot of paperwork and emotions involved in preparing for deployment. Make sure you take plenty of time for yourself and your loved ones, then schedule time to organize your finances for some peace of mind. 
investments, and dependents. It’s an important conversation to have with your partner and establishes:

  • Power of attorney
  • Living will
  • Last will and testament
  • Long-term care
  • Life insurance
  • Survivor benefits
  • Funeral arrangements

Anyone with property, wealth, or dependents should have some estate planning basics secured. These documents will protect your wishes and your family in the event you suffer serious injury. There are several military resources to help you prepare your estate:

  • Defense Finance And Accounting Services’ Survivor Benefit Plan and Reserve Component Survivor Benefit Plan
  • Department Of Defense’s Military Funeral Honors Pre-arrangement 
  • Service Member’s Group Life Insurance
  • Veterans Affairs Survivor’s Benefits
  • The Importance Of Estate Planning In The Military
  • Survivor Benefits Calculator

Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA) allows you to cancel a housing or auto lease, cancel your phone service, and avoid foreclosure on a home you own without penalties. Additionally, you can reduce your debt interest rates while you’re deployed, giving you a leg up on debt repayment or savings goals. Learn more about the SCRA benefits below:

  • Terminating Your Lease For Deployment
  • SCRA Interest Rate Limits
  • SCRA Benefits And Legal Guidance

 

Build a Deployment Budget

Your pay may change during and after deployment, which means it’s time to update your budget. Use a deployment calculator to estimate how your pay will change to get a foundation for your budget. 

Typically, we recommend you put 50 percent of your pay towards needs, like rent and groceries. If you don’t have anyone relying on your income, then you should consider splitting this chunk of change between your savings accounts and debt. 

Make sure you continue to deposit at least 20 percent of your pay into savings, too. Send some of this towards an emergency fund, while the rest can go towards your larger savings goals, like buying a house and retirement. 

Use these resources to help calculate your goals and budgets, as well as planning for your taxes:

  • My Army Benefits Deployment Calculator
  • My Army Benefits Retirement Calculator
  • Mint Budget Calculator
  • IRS Deployed Veteran Tax Extension
  • IRS Military Tax Resources
  • Combat Zone Tax Exclusions

 

Prepare a Deployment Binder

Mockup of someone completing the deployment checklist.

Illustrated button to download our printable depployment binder checklist.

It’s best to organize and arrange all of your documents, information, and needs into a deployment binder for your family. This will hold copies of your estate planning documents, budget information, and additional contacts and documents. 

Make copies of your personal documents, like birth certificates, contracts, bank information, and more. You also want to list important contacts like family doctors, your pet’s veterinarian, household contacts, and your power of attorney. 

Once you have your book ready, give it to your most trusted friend or family member. Again, this point of contact will have a lot of information about you that needs to stay secure. Finish it off with any instructions or to-dos for while you’re gone, and your finances should be secure for your leave. 

While You’re Deployed

Though most of your needs are taken care of before you deploy, there are a few things to settle while you’re away from home. 
Romance and identity scams are especially popular and can cost you thousands. 

  • Social Media Scams To Watch For
  • Romance Scam Red Flags
  • Military Scam Warning Signs

 

Adjust Your Savings 

Since you won’t be responsible for as many bills, and you may have reduced debt interest rates, deployment is the perfect time to build your savings.

While you’re deployed, you may be eligible for the Department of Defense’s Savings Deposit Program (SDP), which offers up to 10 percent interest. This is available to service members deployed to designated combat zones and those receiving hostile fire pay.

Military and federal government employees are also eligible for the Thrift Savings Plan. This is a supplementary retirement savings to your Civil Service Retirement System plan.

  • Savings Deposit Program
  • Thrift Savings Plan Calculator
  • Civil Service Retirement System
  • Military Saves Resources

 

Additional Resources for Financial Assistance

Deployment can be a financially and emotionally difficult time for families of service members. Make sure you and your family have easy access to financial aid in case they find themselves in need. 

Each individual branch of the military offers its own family and financial resources. You can find additional care through local support systems and national organizations, like Military OneSource and the American Legion. 

  • Family Readiness System
  • Navy-marine Corps Relief Society
  • Air Force Aid Society
  • Army Emergency Relief
  • Coast Guard Mutual Assistance
  • Military Onesource’s Financial Live Chat
  • Find Your Military And Family Support Center
  • Emergency Loans Through Military Heroes Fund Foundation Programs
  • The American Legion Family Support Network

After You Return Home

Coming home after deployment may be a rush of emotions. Relief, exhaustion, excitement, and lots of celebration are sure to come with it. There’s a lot to consider with reintegration after deployment, and that includes taking another look at your finances. 

 

Update Your Budget

Just like before deployment, you should update your budget to account for your new spending needs and pay. It’s time to reinstate your car insurance, find housing, and plan your monthly grocery budget. 

After a boost in savings while deployed, you may want to treat yourself to something nice — which is totally okay! The key is to decide what you want for yourself or your family, figure if it’s reasonable while maintaining other savings goals, like your rainy day fund, and limit other frivolous purchases. Now is not the time to go on a spending spree — it’s best to invest this money into education savings, retirement, and other long-term plans.

In addition to your savings goals, make sure you’re prepared to take care of yours and your family’s health. Prioritize your mental health after deployment and speak with a counselor, join support groups, and prepare for reintegration. Your family and children may also have a hard time adjusting, so consider their needs and seek out resources as well. 
FTC | NFCC 

The post Guide to Managing Finances for Deploying Service Members appeared first on MintLife Blog.

Source: mint.intuit.com

Should You Refinance Your Student Loans?

Due to financial consequences of COVID-19 — and the broader impact on our economy — now is an excellent time to consider refinancing most loans you have. This can include mortgage debt you have that may be converted to a new loan with a lower interest rate, as well as auto loans, personal loans, and more.

Refinancing student loans can also make sense if you’re willing to transition student loans you currently have into a new loan with a private lender. Make sure to take time to compare rates to see how you could save money on interest, potentially pay down student loans faster, or even both if you took the steps to refinance.

Get Started and Compare Rates Now

Still, it’s important to keep a close eye on policies and changes from the federal government that have already taken place, as well as changes that might come to fruition in the next weeks or months. Currently, all federal student loans are locked in at a 0% APR and payments are suspended during that time. This change started on March 13, 2020 and lasts for 60 days, so borrowers with federal loans can skip payments and avoid interest charges until the middle of May 2020.

It’s hard to say what will happen after that, but it’s smart to start figuring out your next steps and determining if student loan refinancing makes sense for your situation. Note that, in addition to lower interest rates than you can get with federal student loans, many private student lenders offer signup bonuses as well. With the help of a lower rate and an initial bonus, you could end up far “ahead” by refinancing in a financial sense.

Still, there are definitely some negatives to consider when it comes to refinancing your student loans, and we’ll go over those disadvantages below.

Should You Refinance Now?

Do you have student loan debt at a higher APR than you want to pay?

  • If no: You shouldn’t refinance.
  • If yes: Go to next question.

Do you have good credit or a cosigner? 

  • If no: You shouldn’t refinance.
  • If yes:  Go to next question.

Do you have federal student loans?

  • If no: You can consider refinancing
  • If yes: Go to next question

Are you willing to give up federal protections like deferment, forbearance, and income-driven repayment plans?

  • If no: You shouldn’t refinance
  • If yes: Consider refinancing your loans.

Reasons to Refinance

There are many reasons student borrowers ultimately refinance their student loans, although they can vary from person to person. Here are the main situations where it can make sense to refinance along with the benefits you can expect to receive:

  • Secure a lower monthly payment on your student loans.
    You may want to consider refinancing your student loans if your ultimate goal is reducing your monthly payment so it fits in better with your budget and your goals. A lower interest rate could help you lower your payment each month, but so could extending your repayment timeline.
  • Save money on interest over the long haul.
    If you plan to refinance your loans into a similar repayment timeline with a lower APR, you will definitely save money on interest over the life of your loan.
  • Change up your repayment timeline.
    Most private lenders let you refinance your student loans into a new loan product that lasts 5 to 20 years. If you want to expedite your loan repayment or extend your repayment timeline, private lenders offer that option.
  • Pay down debt faster.
    Also, keep in mind that reducing your interest rate or repayment timeline can help you get out of student loan debt considerably faster. If you’re someone who wants to get out of debt as soon as you can, this is one of the best reasons to refinance with a private lender.

Why You Might Not Want to Refinance Right Now

While the reasons to refinance above are good ones, there are plenty of reasons you may want to pause on your refinancing plans. Here are the most common:

  • You want to wait and see if the federal government will offer 0% APR or forbearance beyond May 2020 due to COVID-19.
    The federal government has only extended forbearance through the middle of May right now, but they might lengthen the timeline of this benefit if you wait it out. Since this perk only applies to federal student loans, you would likely want to keep those loans at 0% APR for as long as the federal government allows.
  • You may want to take advantage of income-driven repayment plans.
    Income-driven repayment plans like Pay As You Earn (PAYE) and Income-Based Repayment let you pay a percentage of your discretionary income each month then have your loans forgiven after 20 to 25 years. These plans only apply to federal student loans, so you shouldn’t refinance with a private lender if you are hoping to sign up.
  • You’re worried you won’t be able to keep up with your student loan payments due to your job or economic conditions.
    Federal student loans come with deferment and forbearance that can buy you time if you’re struggling to make the payments on your student loans. With that in mind, you may not want to give up these protections if you’re unsure about your future and how your finances might be.
  • Your credit score is low and you don’t have a cosigner.
    Finally, you should probably stick with federal student loans if your credit score is poor and you don’t have a cosigner. Federal student loans come with fairly low rates and most don’t require a credit check, so they’re a great deal if your credit is imperfect.

Important Things to Note

Before you move forward with student loan refinancing, there are some details you should know and understand. Here are our top tips and some important factors to keep in mind.

Compare Rates and Loan Terms

Because student loan refinancing is such a competitive industry, shopping around for loans based on their rates and terms can help you find out which lenders are offering the most lucrative refinancing options for someone with your credit profile and income.

We suggest using Credible to shop for student loan refinancing since this loan platform lets you compare offers from multiple lenders in one place. You can even get prequalified for student loan refinancing and “check your rate” without a hard inquiry on your credit score.

Check for Signup Bonuses

Some student loan refinancing companies let you score a bonus of $100 to $750 just for clicking through a specific link to start the process. This money is free money if you’re able to take advantage, and you can still qualify for low rates and fair loan terms that can help you get ahead.

We definitely suggest checking with lenders that offer bonuses provided you can also score the most competitive rates and terms.

Consider Your Personal Eligibility

Also keep your personal eligibility in mind, including factors beyond your credit score. Most applicants who are turned down for student loan refinancing are turned away based on their debt-to-income ratio and not their credit score. Generally speaking, this means they owe too much money on all their debts when you compare their liabilities to their income.

Credible also notes that adding a creditworthy cosigner can improve your chances of prequalifying for a loan. They also state that “many lenders offer cosigner release once borrowers have made a minimum number of on-time payments and can demonstrate they are ready to assume full responsibility for repayment of the loan on their own.”

It’s Not “All or Nothing”

Also, remember that you don’t have to refinance all of your student loans. You can just refinance the loans at the highest interest rates, or any particular loans you believe could benefit from a different repayment term.

4 Steps to Refinance Your Student Loans

Once you’re ready to pull the trigger, there are four simple steps involved in refinancing your student loans.

Step 1: Gather all your loan information.

Before you start the refinancing process, it helps to have all your loan information, including your student loan pay stubs, in one place. This can help you determine the total amount you want to refinance as well as the interest rates and payments you currently have on your loans.

Step 2: Compare lenders and the rates they offer.

From there, take the time to compare lenders in terms of the rates they can offer. You can use this tool to get the process started.

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Step 3: Choose the best loan offer you can qualify for.

Once you’ve filled out basic information, you can choose among multiple loan offers. Make sure to check for signup bonus offers as well as interest rates, loan repayment terms, and interest rates you can qualify for.

Step 4: Complete your loan application.

Once you decide on a lender that offers the best rates and terms, you can move forward with your full student loan refinancing application. Your student loan company will ask for more personal information and details on your existing student loans, which they will combine into your new loan with a new repayment term and monthly payment.

The Bottom Line

Whether it makes sense to refinance your student loans is a huge question that only you can answer after careful thought and consideration. Make sure you weigh all the pros and cons, including what you may be giving up if you’re refinancing federal loans with a private lender.

Refinancing your student loans can make sense if you have a plan to pay them off, but this strategy works best if you create a debt repayment plan you can stick with for the long-term.

The post Should You Refinance Your Student Loans? appeared first on Good Financial Cents®.

Source: goodfinancialcents.com

Credit Card Payoff Calculator: When Could You Reach Financial Freedom?

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Have credit card debt? You’re not the only one. It’s reported that 43 percent of households carry credit card debt month after month. While credit cards can be a great tool to build your credit score, they can easily impact your budget. If you’ve detoured from your financial goals and racked up a hefty bill, now is the perfect time to create a payoff plan. Use our credit card payoff calculator to see when you could be financially free.

Credit Card Payoff Calculator

Enter your card details to calculate your payoff timeline.

Choose One

Please enter your desired payoff date.

Please enter your monthly payment.

Time to Payoff

30 Months

Debt-Free Date

Apr 2023

Monthly Payment

$250.00

Total Paid$7,493.77

Total Principal

$5,000.00

Total Interest

$0.00

See where the rest of your budget is going

to pay off debts that have the highest interest rates to save on added expenses. Use our credit card payoff calculator to see which accounts would cost you more in the long-term.

2. See What Payments Work for Your Budget

Once you have an idea of which accounts you’d like to focus on, figure out the right payments for your budget. Keep in mind, you should still make the minimum payments on debts to keep your credit score in good shape. To calculate how comfortable you are with these payments, download our app and evaluate your budget.

3. Negotiate Your Credit Card Terms

If you have a strong credit score and loyalty to your credit card company, you may be able to negotiate your terms. For example, if you’d like your payment to be due on the 25th instead of the 10th of every month, call a representative and see what they can do. You may not always get what you ask for, but you won’t get what you don’t ask for!

4. Reprioritize Your Budget

After you get a better idea of what your budget looks like, prioritize your expenses. As your wants and needs change, adjust your budget accordingly.

Paying off credit card debt may not be as appealing as buying a new car, but it can be a more responsible financial choice depending on your situation. To ensure you’re staying on track with your biggest financial goals, always keep track of your budget using our app.

The post Credit Card Payoff Calculator: When Could You Reach Financial Freedom? appeared first on MintLife Blog.

Source: mint.intuit.com

Matthew Perry Sells Malibu Beach House for $13.1M

Matthew Perry Sells Malibu homePaul Drinkwater/NBCU/Getty Images

Matthew Perry of “Friends” found a buyer who was there for him. He has successfully sold his Malibu, CA, beach house for $13.1 million.

Perry had initially listed his “kick-ass Malibu home”—as he called his place on social media—in August for $14.95 million. In September, the actor dropped the asking price by a million dollars, to $13.95 million.

He then slashed the price one last time to $12.95 million. That reduction attracted a buyer, who scooped up the swanky space for just a little over the ask.

Although the price ended up lower than his initial asking price, Perry came out ahead. The savvy star picked up the the property in 2011 for $12 million.

Perry reportedly bought the beachfront abode from the Southern California developer Scott Gillen, who completely transformed the circa-1960 build.

The result is a loftlike space with expansive walls of glass, looking out to the Pacific Ocean.

The fab pad can hold lots of friends, with two floors, four bedrooms, and 3.5 bathrooms on 5,000 square feet. The main level features an open living and dining area, a fireplace, beamed ceilings, and sparkling views of the ocean. The glass walls completely open up, extending the living area out to a deck that runs the length of the house on both floors.

A floating wood-and-steel staircase leads to the lower-level master suite, which includes a sitting area, walk-in closet, and luxurious bathroom.

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Watch: Comedian Kathy Griffin Gets a Deal While Downsizing in SoCal

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The home also features an outdoor spa and a state-of-the-art home theater.

Meanwhile, the deck comes with plenty of seating and a fire pit, perfect for catching the sunset.

The open floor plan made the buyer swoon, according to Luis Robledo, the Douglas Elliman agent who represented the buyer.

“The minute you walk through the front door, you have a completely open and expansive view of the ocean, with floor-to-ceiling and wall-to-wall windows,” Robledo says. “Two decks on both levels spanning the length of the home—maximizing the outdoor space—also made it extremely compelling. This is the perfect getaway place.”

Perry took full advantage of the beach pad as his personal getaway during the pandemic. He posted photos to his Instagram account from the property as he hung out on his deck or baked cookies in the kitchen.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Matthew Perry (@mattyperry4)

Perry had been on a selling spree, also placing a posh penthouse on the market in Los Angeles in 2019 for $35 million. In 2017, he bought the “mansion in the sky,” which occupies the entire 40th floor of the Wilshire Corridor’s elite Century Building, for $20 million.

He renovated the place to his taste, with what looks like wall-to-wall velvet furniture, a huge master suite with views, and the home theater. The listing is currently off market.

Now that he’s freed from his real estate concerns, the star’s new focus appears to be an adorable puppy.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Matthew Perry (@mattyperry4)

Luis Robledo of Douglas Elliman represented the buyer. Joshua Flagg with Rodeo Realty repped the seller.

The post Matthew Perry Sells Malibu Beach House for $13.1M appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.

Source: realtor.com

Fed: Credit card balances dipped by $3 billion in December

Credit card balances edged down in December, even as consumers engaged in holiday shopping, as uncertainty about a second round of stimulus checks extended to the latter part of the month.

Consumer revolving debt – which is mostly based on credit card balances – was down $3 billion on a seasonally adjusted basis in December to $975.9 billion, according to the Fed’s G. 19 consumer credit report released Feb. 5.

In December, credit card balances were off 3.6% on an annualized basis, following November’s revised 0.8% dip and October’s 6.7% drop, which came on the heels of September’s 3.2% annualized gain.

The Fed also reported that student loan debt outstanding for the fourth quarter rose to $1.707 trillion, from the third quarter’s $1.704 trillion. And auto loan debt outstanding gained to $1.228 trillion, from the third quarter’s $1.219 trillion.

Total consumer debt outstanding – which includes student loans and auto loans, as well as revolving debt – continued to grow and rose $9.7 billion to $4.184 trillion in December, a 2.8% annualized gain.

For the entire year, credit card balances were down 11.2%.

Card balances had been growing before the coronavirus impacted consumer spending and bank lending in 2020. They dipped below the $1 trillion mark last May, for the first time since September 2017.

See related: 51% of consumers accrued more debt during the pandemic

ABA sees brighter days ahead for credit availability

The American Bankers Association reports, based on input provided by chief economists of large North American banks to its credit conditions index for the first quarter of 2021, that credit conditions (both credit quality and availability) have rebounded from their lows of last summer.

However, all three components of the index (the headline credit index, the consumer credit index and the business credit index) remain below 50, which is not a robust index reading. It indicates that while bank economists expect credit conditions to remain “soft” in the coming six months, they are less pessimistic than they were in September 2020 when the ABA  conducted its last credit conditions survey.

The consumer credit index component of the survey gained to 45.3, its highest level since mid-2019. Economists are optimistic about both the availability and quality of consumer credit compared to September. They expect credit to be more available to consumers in the coming six months, although a small majority expects credit quality to decline.

“Although credit quality is still expected to worsen over the first half of the year for both consumers and businesses, the overall outlook for credit markets has improved significantly since the summer and fall,” said Rob Strand, ABA senior economist. “As widespread inoculations against the virus and new fiscal stimulus measures help heal the economy, banks will continue to work closely with policymakers, consumers and businesses to ensure that affordable credit remains available and recovery strengthens.”

Fed reports easing of credit card lending standards in fourth quarter

According to the Fed’s senior loan officer opinion survey on bank lending practices for January 2021 (which is based on input related to the fourth quarter of 2020), a “moderate net share of banks” reported that they had eased up on credit card loans.

As a result, a “modest net share of banks” also hiked up their credit limits on credit card accounts. And a “moderate net share of banks” reported that there was higher demand for credit card loans during the fourth quarter.

As for the outlook, a “significant net share of banks” is expected to ease up on their standards for credit card loans. They are doing so in anticipation of an improvement in their loan portfolios’ credit quality, as well as a hike in their tolerance for risk.

Also, the New York Fed’s survey of consumer expectations for December 2020 finds that consumers are less concerned about the possibility of missing a minimum debt payment in the coming three months. The average perceived probability of this occurrence dipped to 10.5% for December, from November’s 10.9%.

See related: What happens when you miss a credit card payment?

Jobs edge up in January

The New York Fed survey also finds that on average fewer consumers expect the unemployment rate to be higher a year from now, with this probability declining to 38.9%, from November’s 40.1%.

While the average perceived probability of losing a job in the coming 12 months rose up a bit to 15% (mainly on account of those without a college degree), respondents were also more likely to leave their job voluntarily. However, they were less optimistic about landing a new job if they lost their current ones.

The U.S employment situation was about stable in January, with the economy adding 49,000 jobs, the government reported Feb. 5. “The labor market continued to reflect the impact of the coronavirus pandemic and efforts to contain it,” according to the Department of Labor’s employment report media release. The unemployment rate dipped 0.4 percentage points to 6.3% and average hourly earnings were up $0.06 to $29.96. Also, the job numbers for both November and December were revised down, with November down 77,000 jobs (to 264,000) and December losing an additional 87,000 jobs (to minus 227,000).

In his daily email commentary, Ian Shepherdson, chief economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics, noted, “Coupled with the -159K net revision, this is a significantly softer report than expected, at least in terms of payrolls. Bulls will cite the large and unexpected drop in the unemployment rate, but two-third(s) of the decline was due to a 405K drop in the size of the labor force – a sign of discouragement – while household employment rose 201K.”

He added that “the labor market was frozen at the start of the year, and is completely dependent on the pace of reopening, which in turn is contingent on the speed and sustainability of the fall in hospitalizations.”

Source: creditcards.com

What Is “Accessible Income” on a Credit Card Application?

If you’re applying for a credit card, you might stumble upon this term “accessible income.” In fact, that’s the only situation in which you will come across the term: on a credit card application. So, you need to know what it is.

Accessible income is not just income you earn from your regular job. Rather, it includes much more than that. It includes income from a wide variety of sources, like retirement savings accounts, social security payments, trust funds, just to name a few.

Accessible income can work in your favor because not only you can list income from your job, but also all types of other money you receive in a given year. This in turn will increase your chance of getting approved for the credit card, simply because you can list a higher income.

It also can get you approved for a higher credit limit, which in turn can help your credit score and allow you more spending freedom. In this article, I will explain what accessible income is and the types of income you need to include in your credit card application. Before you start applying for too many credit cards, consult with a financial advisor who can help you develop a plan.

What is accessible income?

Accessible income means all of the money that you have accessed to if you are 21 years old or older. According to the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act, lenders are required to offer you credit if you are able to pay your bill. If you do not make enough money and do not receive enough income from other sources and cannot make payments, they can reject your application. That is why they ask for your accessible income.

If you are between the age of 18 and 20, your accessible income is limited to income for your job, scholarships, grants and money from your parents or other people.

However, if you are 21 and older, your accessible income involves way more than that. It includes income from the following sources:

  • Income paychecks
  • Tips
  • Bank checking accounts
  • Savings accounts
  • Income of a spouse
  • Grants, scholarships, and other forms of financial aid
  • Investments income
  • Retirement funds
  • Trust funds
  • Passive income
  • Checks from child support and spousal maintenance
  • Allowances from your parents or grandparents
  • Social security payments or SSI Disability payments

To report that accessible income, just add them all up to arrive at a total and submit it. The credit card companies will not ask you to provide the specific source of each income

What does not count as accessible income

Loans including personal loans, mortgage, auto loans do not count as accessible income simply because they are borrowed money. So, do not list them when submitting your credit card application.

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Accessible income on the credit card application

Accessible income is only associated with credit card applications. In other words, you’re only asked that when you’re applying for credit cards. When applying for a credit card, you should take advantage of all sources of income and not just the income from your job.

So, you should make sure to gather all of the money you have accessed to that year. Not doing so means that you’re leaving other income that is just as important. As mentioned above, you should not include loans or any borrowed money.

When reporting your accessible income, be as accurate and truthful as possible. While some credit card companies may take your word for it, others may ask you to verify your income. In that case, you will need to provide hard proof like pay stubs, bank statements, statement from your investments accounts, etc…

Why providing accessible income important?

Your credit score is the most important factor credit card companies rely on to decide whether to offer you a credit card. However, your income is also important. The higher your income, the better.

A high income means that you’re able to cover debt that you may accumulate on your credit card. And the higher your chance is that they will approve you. The opposite is true. If you have a low income, some credit card companies may not approve you even if you have a good credit score. So, in order to increase your chance, you should take advantage of accessible income.

The bottom line

The only situation where you will find “accessible income” is on a credit card application. Accessible income is all income you have access to in any given year. That includes much more than your paychecks from your regular jobs.

But it also includes all types of money including checks from child support or alimony, allowances from your parents or grandparents, money in your retirement and investment accounts, etc. So, you should take advantage of it when applying for a credit card.

Speak with the Right Financial Advisor

You can talk to a financial advisor who can review your finances and help you reach your goals (whether it is making more money, paying off debt, investing, buying a house, planning for retirement, saving, etc). Find one who meets your needs with SmartAsset’s free financial advisor matching service. You answer a few questions and they match you with up to three financial advisors in your area. So, if you want help developing a plan to reach your financial goals, get started now.

The post What Is “Accessible Income” on a Credit Card Application? appeared first on GrowthRapidly.

Source: growthrapidly.com

I Was Denied an Auto Loan. Now What?

Bright sunshine shines in the windshield of a car as a person with a backwards baseball cap drives with one hand on the steering wheel.

You’re in the market for a new car but you’ve been denied an auto loan. Now what? Here’s what you need to know about why you may have been denied and what to do to make sure it doesn’t happen again.

Why Do I Keep Getting Denied for Auto Loans?

Unfortunately, there are many reasons a bank might reject your application for a car loan. If your loan application has recently been denied or you keep getting denied, it might be due to one of these common reasons:

  • Application errors. Sometimes, the application could be rejected because of an error you made when filling it out. A missed section, some incorrect information, a missing form or another mistake can mean your loan is ultimately denied.
  • Bad credit. Bad credit is a common reason for auto loan denial. A score below 670 is usually considered a bad credit score, and this damages lenders’ trust in your ability to pay off a loan.
  • Too much debt. A high debt-to-income ratio can make lenders leery. If you have a number of loans or credit cards with large amounts of debt, this raises your DTI and may lower your chance of getting approved for future loans, car loans included.
  • No credit. Lenders look for proof of consistency in paying off past loans when reviewing your application. If you have no credit history, lenders may feel they don’t have enough information about your ability to pay off a future loan.

What Can I Do If My Loan Application Is Denied?

You have a few options when you’ve been denied an auto loan, depending on the reason you were rejected.

Application Error

If you were rejected because of an application error on your part, you should contact the bank as soon as you can. Hopefully, the mix-up can be resolved and your request will be approved. If not, the lender will tell you when you can reapply.

Poor Credit

If you were rejected because of poor credit, check your credit report so you can determine what is negatively impacting your score. Depending on what your report says, look into ways to improve your credit so you can be approved next time. Pay your bills on time, and use your credit cards to make and then repay smaller purchases. Keep in mind that building or rebuilding your credit can take a while. Don’t be disappointed if it takes months or even a year or two to really get your score where you want it.

If you need a loan sooner, consider adding a cosigner to your application that can be your backup if you fail to pay the loan. Lenders feel more comfortable with this method, and it’s a good way to prove dependability.

Debt

If you were rejected because you already have too much debt, it’s important to reduce that amount in steady increments. Set a budget and stick to it, tackling the largest debts first. Avoid adding any debt to what you already have. Examine your credit card usage for any unnecessary expenses and cut back on those in the future.

No Credit

If you don’t have a credit history, now’s the time to start. There are a lot of ways to start building your credit: you might be able to become an authorized user on someone else’s credit card or find a co-signer for your loan, for example. You also might want to apply for a secured credit card or credit card for no credit.

Find the right credit card for your needs. Learn more.

Does Getting Denied a Loan Hurt My Credit?

Getting denied for an auto loan doesn’t in itself hurt your credit score. The lender didn’t extend anything, so there’s nothing that can hurt your score. However, multiple denied applications at once could hurt your score.

A bank conducts a “hard inquiry” when you apply for a loan. This can cause a drop in your credit score slightly—about five to ten points—whether you’re accepted or not. If you apply for too many loans, numerous hard inquiries on your credit can cause a larger drop.

What Are My Other Options?

If you don’t have time to build or rebuild your credit, can’t get a co-signer, and need a car fast, there are two options to be considered as a last resort.

“Buy Here Pay Here” Dealers

Stop by your neighborhood “Buy Here Pay Here” (BHPH) auto dealer, and one way or another, it will probably get you into a car. It won’t be a new car, and it will probably have lots of miles on it, but at least you’ll get a car you desperately need to get you to and fro.

The BHPH dealer won’t want to talk to you about interest rates. Your local BHPH will focus on your expected monthly payment and ask for a really big down payment. They mostly care about whether or not you have a current, steady income. Based on that, they’ll determine how much they are willing to lend and which car options are available to you. It’s not a great way to buy a car, but for millions of Americans, it is the only way they can make this significant a purchase.

Unfortunately, purchasing a car at a BHPH dealer isn’t a credit boost at all. They usually don’t report anything positive to credit reporting agencies, but they will report negative actions like a missed payment or repossession. Always ask about their late payment policies before making a decision.

Alternative Credit Bureaus

If your credit score is low or your credit history is light based on traditional credit trade lines (credit cards and loans), but you have a solid history of paying your everyday bills, you may be able to take advantage of alternative credit scoring methods. If you can prove your creditworthiness by having your everyday bills verified, some companies will work with alternative credit scoring methods to offer credit. Alternative credit generally doesn’t carry the same weight as traditional credit lines, so interest rates likely will not be as competitive.

At this point, you can go to any dealer and buy the car you really want instead of being limited to the inventory on a BHPH lot. If you can afford the payments, you can buy a new car that’s under warranty and has no mileage on the odometer. If you can continue to work on your credit and improve your credit score, refinancing may even be available down the road.

However, many lenders still do not use alternative credit and don’t view it as proof of reliability. Most of these alternative credit companies also don’t report your findings to the major credit bureaus. So, while these alternative creditors may be a short-term option, building credit through traditional methods should be a priority.

Why Would I Get Rejected for a Car Refinance?

If you were denied for refinancing, it’s probably because of a poor credit score or a high DTI. Usually, these are the same as the reasons you might be denied an auto loan. Your score may have been satisfactory when you purchased the vehicle but taken a few hits since its purchase.

How to Get Approved Next Time

Before you reapply for an auto loan, make sure all your information is in order. Gather your records and make sure everything is ironed out and correct before you go to a lender. For a better shot at loan approval, your credit score should be in a comfortable range, and you shouldn’t have any large outstanding debts. Always check your credit score before you apply. If it’s not high enough for loan approval, work to improve your credit first. Then, make sure you’ve determined what type of payments and interest you can afford.

If you do get denied, don’t worry! By making sure you meet all of the income, credit and debt requirements for an auto loan, you can increase your chance of getting accepted the next time you apply.

The post I Was Denied an Auto Loan. Now What? appeared first on Credit.com.

Source: credit.com

Plymouth Rock Assurance Review

Founded in 1982, Plymouth Rock Assurance provides a selection of property insurance and bodily injury insurance products to customers across the states of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Hampshire.

In this Plymouth Rock Assurance review, we’ll compare this provider to other regional and national insurance carriers, helping you find the best insurance policy for your needs.

Plymouth Rock Car Insurance Coverage

Plymouth Rock Assurance offers a host of car insurance coverage options, allowing you to meet the minimum requirements in your state and go above and beyond those requirements when needed,

Bodily Injury Coverage: Limited to a fixed amount of money per person and per accident, bodily injury insurance covers the harm done to other people in an accident. It is designed to help them with their medical bills and other payments resulting from an accident.

Property Damage Coverage: Also fixed to a specific sum, property damage insurance is designed to cover the other driver’s vehicle in an accident, as well as other property that you damage.

Collision Coverage: A type of insurance that covers you for damages done to your own car. With collision insurance, you will be covered regardless of who caused the accident and you’ll also get cover if the accident involves an obstacle (tree, guardrail, wall, fence) as opposed to another vehicle. You will not, however, be covered if you hit a deer. One of the quirks of this coverage option is that you’re only covered for animal collisions if you swerve and hit a wall/tree.

Comprehensive Coverage: With comprehensive coverage, you’re generally covered for the things that collision insurance can’t reach. It covers deer collisions and other accidents involving animal strikes and it also covers damage caused by weather and vandalism.

Personal Injury Protection (PIP): This coverage option works like bodily injury coverage, only instead of protecting the other driver and their passengers, it protects you, covering you for lost wages and medical bills.

Medical Payments: A type of insurance specifically designed to cover your medical bills. Unlike PIP, medical payments coverage will not give you money lost as a result of missed work.

Underinsured/Uninsured Motorist Coverage: When the other driver’s insurance cannot cover your claims, either because they don’t have enough or they don’t have any, uninsured/underinsured motorist insurance will step in.

Plymouth Rock Assurance Auto Insurance Features

Plymouth Rock Assurance has three different levels of auto insurance: Plus, Preferred, and Premier.  There are different coverage options available at each of these levels and you can upgrade if you feel that those options will serve you well.

Some of the features offered at these different levels, along with the additional coverage offered to all policyholders, include:

  • Door to Door Valet Claim Service: Plymouth Rock auto insurance customers can arrange for their cars to be picked up from their homes and taken to a nearby repair shop. Once it has been fixed, it will be returned at a time that is convenient to the policyholder.
  • Guaranteed Repairs: If performed at a listed repair shop, all repairs will be guaranteed by Plymouth Rock.
  • Comprehensive Claim Forgiveness: Plymouth Rock promises that your insurance premiums will not increase just because you make a claim about a stolen or weather-damaged vehicle.
  • Get Home Safe: If, for whatever reason, you don’t feel safe to drive home, Plymouth Rock will cover your taxi ride. This can happen one time per year as part of most Plymouth Rock car insurance policies.
  • Glass Coverage: Plymouth Rock offers several coverage options and policy features related to windshield repair and glass repair. This includes a $100 glass deductible and a waived glass deductible repair.
  • New Car Replacement: If you have a new car that gets totaled within a specific timeframe, Plymouth Rock will replace it completely.
  • Crashbusters: Plymouth Rock will send a Crashbusters team to your location at your request. They will assess the damage done to your vehicle and can help you to file a claim.
  • Pet Injury: In the event that your pet gets injured during a car accident, some Plymouth Rock policyholders can claim a small portion of the vet fees. After all, your dog or cat needs cover too!
  • Roadside Assistance: With the Plymouth Rock roadside assistance program, you’ll be covered for some of the services charged on broken down vehicles at the roadside, including towing, tire changes, fuel delivery, and more. 
  • Key Replacement: Lost your key? With the right cover from Plymouth Rock, you can get a replacement set.

Plymouth Rock Car Insurance Discounts

Plymouth Rock discounts differ from state to state and from user to user. The biggest of these are multi-policy discounts, which are offered when you purchase multiple policies, and prepay discounts, which are offered when you pay your insurance premiums upfront. 

Other available discounts include:

  • Paperless Filing: Go paperless and do your bit for the environment while helping to reduce waste and saving a few cents in the process.
  • Membership Organization Discounts: Make big savings when you are a member of specific organizations.
  • Senior Discount: Drivers above a certain age can apply.
  • Good Student Discount: Offered to young drivers who obtain at least a B average.
  • Safety Features and Anti-Theft Devices: If your car contains key features like trackers, alarms, airbags, seatbelts, and anti-lock brakes, these discounts will be available to you.
  • Driver Training: Complete driver training courses to prove your skills, show your commitment, and make some savings.
  • Low Mileage: Drive less and you could pay less.

Other Plymouth Rock Insurance Products

In addition to car insurance, the Plymouth Rock Assurance Corporation offers a wealth of insurance products. These are also confined to a very small part of the United States and include:

Home Insurance

Plymouth Rock offers comprehensive insurance quotes for all homeowners. These policies will cover you for the breakdown of key appliances, loss of personal items, identity theft protection, and even protection against hacks and cybercrime.

You can apply for Plymouth Rock home insurance directly if you live in New Jersey, New York, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, and Connecticut.

Renters Insurance

Renters insurance will cover you for personal losses in the home, as well as providing liability protection for anyone who gets injured in your home. Plymouth Rock renters insurance is available in the same states as Plymouth Rock home insurance.

Life Insurance

Plymouth Rock life insurance policies are only available in the state of New Jersey. Both term life insurance and variable life insurance policies are available, of which term life is arguably the better choice.

Policyholders can opt for a term of between 10 and 30 years, with the insurance premiums and payouts dependent on your age, health, medical history, and other key factors.

Umbrella Insurance

An umbrella insurance policy essentially increases your liability limits, going the extra mile to protect you. It is a supplemental insurance policy, designed to be added onto car insurance or homeowners insurance and to protect you and your family in the event that a claim is made against you.

Plymouth Rock Customer Satisfaction and Claims Satisfaction

Plymouth Rock has good ratings from customers and experts. It has an A- rating from AM Best, which isn’t the highest possible rating but is a great effort from a relatively small company (when compared to giants like GEICO and State Farm).

The insurance claims process is quick and easy, and while there are a number of bad reviews and complaints out there, Plymouth Rock seems committed to remedying these as quickly and completely as possible.

Furthermore, if you have a bad experience with Plymouth Rock, make your discontent clear and they will make a donation to a charity of your choice. This proves that Plymouth Rock is committed to keeping customers happy and willing to do whatever it takes.

Bottom Line: Car Insurance in New England

Plymouth Rock is a very highly-rated insurance company offering a selection of products directly and through insurance agents. It has accident forgiveness and claims forgiveness; offers a multitude of ways to pay your premiums, and the support team is available around the clock. 

If you reside in one of the states where Plymouth Rock operates, visit PlymouthRock.com, get a quote, and start comparing. If not, don’t worry, as there are many other great insurance company reviews to check out, including The General, Progressive, and Esurance.

Plymouth Rock Assurance Review is a post from Pocket Your Dollars.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com